BioND — Dynamics of Biological Networks

Media Coverage

link to source Kevin Knudson, Forbes, 2015-10-15
Scientists love unifying theories – a single equation (or set of equations) that explains everything in the discipline. Physicists have been searching for theirs for decades, running into difficulty unifying quantum theory with relativity. Economists work very hard at trying to model the global economy via complicated regression models. Until recently, however, ecologists thought that different food webs operated under distinct conditions. That is, the dynamics of foxes and squirrels must be different from those of parasites eating hosts.
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link to source George Lamb, George Lamb Show, 2015-09-23
Interview about the Bristol Bridge walk on the George Lamb Show.
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link to source Just Cebrian, Science Magazines, 2015-09-04
All organisms in an ecosystem can be placed on a trophic level, depending on whether they are producers or consumers of energy within the food chain (see the photo). Ecologists have long debated what regulates the trophic structure and dynamics of ecosystems (1). This is important because trophic structure and dynamics regulate many of the goods and services that ecosystems provide to wildlife and humankind, such as the production of harvestable food and energy, carbon sequestration and modulation of climate change, and nutrient uptake and control of global biogeochemical cycles (2). A study by Hatton et al. on page 1070 of this issue (3) and a recent report by Lafferty et al. (4) represent important advances toward a unified theory of trophic structure that captures observed trends across all ecosystems.
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link to source American Scientist, 2015-05-15
From the Cambrian Burgess Shale to ancient Egypt, food webs share surprising structural attributes. When redundancy is lost, the threat of extinction grows.
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link to source Jeffrey Lucas, Bristol , 2014-10-15
Is it possible to cross Bristol’s 43 bridges without crossing the same bridge twice? This is an example of the 'Seven Bridges of Königsberg' problem in mathematics. A route that solves the problem for Bristol's bridges has been devised by Dr Thila Gross, Reader in the Department of Engineering Mathematics of Bristol University. He came to Bristol from his native Germany about three years ago because Bristol is one of the best places in the world for this particular subject. He wanted to find an interesting way of introducing his students to network theory - and he realised that Bristol and its bridges had a resemblance to Königsberg – except that it has three 'islands' - Spike Island, St Phillips and Redcliffe – and 43 bridges, not 2 and 7 respectively. Nevertheless, he knew that the ‘Königsberg bridge problem’ could be applied to Bristol - walk across all of its bridges without crossing the same one twice - and he knew that it did have a solution. So he set about solving it.
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link to source Fabio de Castro, http://ciencia.estadao.com.br/noticias/geral,egito-ja-teve-leao-girafa-e-hipopotamo,1571050, 2014-10-04
Em estudo, cientistas reconstruiram interacões ecologicas dos maniferos ao longo de 6 mil annos: de 37 espécies originais, sobraram 8
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link to source Clive Cookson and Tyler Shendruk, Financial Times Weekend Magazine, 2014-10-03
Research concludes that the region is more vulnerable to environmental perturbations today than at any previous time in recorded history
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link to source Tajirul Hague, New Historian, 2014-09-15
According to a new study that was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a number of creatures that have been depicted in Ancient Egyptian artifacts have helped scientists to create a record of mammal extinctions that date back to 6000 years. The study might not offer comprehensive proof that population pressures and droughts forced these animals away, but they do depict an interesting pattern.
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link to source Archeology, 2014-09-14
Ancient Egyptian images of the natural world have helped quantitative ecologist Justin Yeakel of the University of California, Santa Cruz, determine that the drying climate and growing human population have probably made Egypt’s ecosystem progressively less stable.
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link to source Robert Czepel, Austrian Broadcasting, 2014-09-09
Vor 6.000 Jahren lebten in Ägypten noch Löwen, Elefanten und Giraffen. Heute sind sie längst aus dem Niltal verschwunden. Forscher haben die Wellen des Aussterbens mit Hilfe von Tierdarstellungen auf Kunstwerken rekonstruiert. Ihr Fazit: Verantwortlich dafür waren der Klimawandel - und der Mensch.
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link to source Sarah Griffith, Daily Mail, 2014-09-09
Rock inscriptions and tomb carvings have shed light on the large beasts that thrived in Egypt before they were wiped out around 6,000 years ago.
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link to source Popular Archaeology, 2014-09-08
Ancient Egyptian artworks help scientists reconstruct how animal communities changed as climate became drier and human populations grew.
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link to source John Roach, NBC News, 2014-09-08
Images of lions, giraffes, wildebeests and other creatures depicted on ancient Egyptian artifacts have helped scientists create a 6,000-year record of local mammal extinctions, according to a new study. Several of the extinction episodes correlate with known periods of drought and rapid human population growth.
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link to source Sarah Zielinski, Smithsonian Magazine, 2014-09-08
Ancient Egypt’s highly decorated tombs and funerary objects—meant to ensure a safe trip into the afterlife—also hold a rich record of the region’s wildlife. Now scientists have used that art, along with other paleontological, archaeological and historical evidence, to map out the rise and fall of Egypt’s large mammals and match those patterns to changes in climate and human interactions.
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link to source Jessica Ruvinsky, Science, 2014-09-08
Six thousand years ago, Egyptian lions hunted wildebeests and zebras in a landscape that resembled the Serengeti more than the Sahara. Since then, the number of large mammal species has decreased from 37 to eight, says quantitative ecologist Justin Yeakel of the Santa Fe Institute. New research using ancient animal depictions tracks the collapse of Egypt’s ecological networks one extinction at a time, offering a glimpse into how climate change and human impacts have altered the structure and stability of ecosystems over millennia.
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link to source Roland G. Roberts, PloS Biology Synopsis, 2014-06-17
We all pass unwanted stuff on to our children—emotional baggage, peculiar habits, unfashionable furniture. Cells do the same thing when they divide; along with their newly replicated genomes andthe vital cellular organelles, they also pass on a lifetime’s worth of accrued rubbish. An important component of this is the legacy of insoluble aggregated protein that the parent cell has failed to deal with by the normal processes of degradation, and the amount that’s passed on can affect the lifespan and wellbeing of the daughter cells.
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link to source Business Standard, 2013-09-30
Scientists have discovered a microbe that stays young forever by rejuvenating every time it reproduces, a finding that provides fundamental insights into the mechanisms of ageing.
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link to source Phil Hammond, BBC Radio Bristol, 2013-09-21
The only place where you can book a regular appointment with a GP on a Saturday.
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link to source PA, Huffington Post, 2013-09-14
For lessons in anti-ageing, we need look no further than celebrities who are obsessed with youth and suffer disastrous consequences at the end of a plastic surgeon's knife. However, could there finally be a solution in nature for a more natural-looking method of anti-ageing?
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link to source VLM, Evening Gazette (Croatia), 2013-09-13
Istraživa?ki tim pokazao je da su stanice pivskog kvasca Schizosaccharomyces pombe imune na starenje kada se reproduciraju i rastu pod odre?enim uvjetima.
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link to source 2013-09-13, The Herald, 2013-09-13
The yeast microbe, called S. pombe, is said to be immune to ageing, as it rejuvenates every time it reproduces.
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link to source The Scotsman, 2013-09-13
A MICROBE that stays forever young and could help unlock the secrets of ageing has been discovered by scientists.
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link to source Claudia Lord, Bild, 2013-09-13
Es ist ein Menschheitstraum – die ewige Jugend! Jetzt kam Dr. Iva Tolic-Nørrelykke (39) vom Max-Planck-Institut für Molekulare Zellbiologie und Genetik dem Geheimnis ein großes Stück näher!
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link to source Western Daily Press, 2013-09-12
A microbe that stays forever young and could help unlock the secrets of ageing has been discovered by scientists.
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link to source Norbert Lossau, Die Welt, 2013-09-12
Seegurken, Süßwasserpolypen oder Pilze machen es uns vor: Sie können offenbar ewig leben. Eine Hefe-Art aber treibt es auf die Spitze: Sie verjüngt sich sogar.
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link to source Guernsey Press, 2013-09-12
A microbe that stays forever young and could help unlock the secrets of ageing has been discovered by scientists.
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link to source Virginia Gewin, nature, 2013-08-08
Ancient Egyptian rock inscriptions and carvings on pharaonic tombs chronicle hartebeest and oryx — horned beasts that thrived in the region more than 6,000 years ago. Researchers have now shown that those mammal populations became unstable in concert with significant shifts in Egypt’s climate.
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link to source David Clensy, The Post, 2013-03-01
David Clensy meets the Bristol University mathematician who challenged himself to cross all of Bristol’s bridges - going over each one just once.
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link to source Chris Löwer, P.M., 2013-02-01
Nur scheinbar eine einförmige Masse: Fische im Schwarm sind nicht alle gleich – es gibt „meinungsbildende“ und Mitläufer.
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link to source Sunita Sohoni, MaddowBlog, 2012-04-24
Turns out physics can explain more than just why a ball bounces or a tea kettle whistles. Physics can also help explain why American politics is so polarized. We discovered this when Rachel was cited in a physics paper (pdf) published this month by the American Physical Society.
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link to source Manuela Lenzen, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, 2012-03-14
Ignoranten sind eine Gefahr für die Demokratie. Wie leicht könnten sie in ihrer Ahnungslosigkeit dem erstbesten Demagogen aufsitzen! Stimmt nicht, sagen Ian D. Couzin und Mitautoren: Uninformierte Individuen befördern den demokratischen Konsens - jedenfalls bei Notemigonus crysoleucas, einem schwarmbildenden Süßwasserfisch.
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link to source Rachel Ehrenberg, ScienceNews, 2012-02-08
Math tools predict when systems are on the brink.
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link to source Tim Barribeau, io9, 2012-02-03
Predicting when a complex system will go through a sudden change is hard — either you need vast swathes of information, or you make rather bad predictions. But we want to spot critical transitions before they happen, regardless of whether we're talking about irreversible damage to coral reefs, stock market crashes, or fishery collapses.
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link to source CBC Radio, 2011-12-19
We journalists like to think that what we do is vital for democracy. That keeping the people informed of a complex world empowers each individual, and helps people make the best choices for the whole of society. According to a new study published in the journal Science, however, we've got it all backwards. The conclusion of the study is that the health of a democracy is dependent on keeping people UN-informed. Or some of them, anyway.
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link to source PTI, Firstpost, 2011-12-19
Ignorance is bliss, it’s often said, but it seems it can also promote democracy, a new study based on animal behaviour says.
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link to source Scinexx, 2011-12-19
Ob in einem Fischschwarm oder in einer menschlichen Gesellschaft: Soziale Lebewesen müssen gemeinsam Entscheidungen treffen. Nicht immer setzt sich dabei die Mehrheit durch. In manchen Fällen gelingt es einer zielstrebigen kleinen Gruppe, die ganze Gemeinschaft in ihrem Sinne zu beeinflussen. Ein Forscherteam hat jetzt anhand von Computermodellen und Verhaltensstudien an Fischen herausgefunden, dass uninformierte Individuen die Entscheidung einer Mehrheit unterstützen und verhindern können, dass sich eine besonders entschlossene Minderheit durchsetzt.
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link to source Christopher Shea, Wall Street Journal, 2011-12-19
Computer models and experiments with shiners, a kind of fish, demonstrate that, within groups, members with weak preferences can prevent minorities with strongly held views from getting their way.
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link to source Rob Waugh, Daily Mail Online, 2011-12-19
A well-informed, interested public is often hailed as the 'ideal' of democracy. But a new Princeton study suggests that the opposite could be the case - and that people who have no interest at all could be vital to the working of a democratic society.
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link to source Jeffrey Kluger , Time, 2011-12-19
The Tea Party and the Occupy Wall Streeters owe a lot to a little fish called the golden shiner.
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link to source Jürgen Schönstein, Science Blogs, 2011-12-19
Auf diesen knappen Nenner lassen sich die Ergenisse des Papers Uninformed Individuals Promote Democratic Consensus in Animal Groups bringen, das in der aktuellen Ausgabe von Science erschienen ist.
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link to source Christine Lepisto, Treehugger, 2011-12-18
First of all, kudos to Iain Couzin and his team at Princeton for an elegant bit of research using shiner fish to validate computer models exploring the effect of the uninformed population on consensus when opposing minority interests threaten to doom decision making.
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link to source Brunei Times, 2011-12-17
It might sound fishy, but researchers at Princeton University say minnows make perfect lab rats when it comes to exploring the surprising power of the uninformed in group decision-making.
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link to source Eberhard Lauth, The European, 2011-12-17
Uninformierte und Ungebildete können sich jederzeit von Modernisierungsverlierern zum entscheidenden Faktor für Umbrüche entwickeln. Das ist gerade jetzt wichtig. Und die Fische machen es vor.
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link to source St. Albert Gazette, 2011-12-17
A new study suggests that uninformed voters may help, not hinder, democratic decisions.
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link to source Gill Eapen , Scientific Sense, 2011-12-16
A recent study shows that some percentage of uninformed (ignorant) individuals promote democratic consensus in animal groups. This is a very interesting finding as the same appears to be true in complex human societies as well. Through theory and experiments, the article demonstrates that the presence of uninformed individuals inhibit the process of domination by a strongly opinionated minority. If the strongly opinionated minority is pushing toward an optimal outcome for the system, ignorant participants will slow them down.
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link to source Kate Shaw, Wired, 2011-12-16
How do groups of animals make collective decisions? Last week, we learned that bees reach consensus by headbutting those with opposing views. But in many other species, the decision-making process is a bit more democratic. In cases where social animals are unrelated and have different self-interests (such as our own), contrasting opinions are common. But it can be just as common for individuals to either be uninformed about the options, or simply not care much about the decision.
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link to source BBC.co.uk, 2011-12-16
Disinterested individuals are vital for achieving a democratic consensus, according to a study in the journal Science.
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link to source AFP, Ottawa Citizen, 2011-12-15
It might sound fishy, but researchers at Princeton University say minnows make perfect lab rats when it comes to exploring the surprising power of the uninformed in group decision-making.
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link to source Joseph Castro, LiveScience, 2011-12-15
Ignorance can be bliss, but it seems it can also promote democracy.
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link to source AFP, ABC Science, 2011-12-15
It might sound fishy, but US researchers say minnows make perfect lab rats when it comes to exploring the surprising power of the uninformed in group decision-making.
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link to source Paul Basken, The Cronicle of higher education, 2011-12-15
As Congress proves itself increasingly dysfunctional and captive to extremists, lots of people may be asking themselves: What kind of fish-brained voters keep electing these guys?
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link to source Joseph Castro, MSNBC.com, 2011-12-15
Minority can persuade majority, until the unknowing come along, study finds.
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link to source Eva Obermüller, ORF.at, 2011-12-15
Der mündige und informierte Bürger ist Grundlage jeder funktionierenden Demokratie, so die gängige Annahme. Eine Studie besagt hingegen: Unwissende, interesselose Individuen sind ebenso wichtig für den demokratischen Konsens.
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link to source Susan Milius, ScienceNews, 2011-12-15
Decisions can be more democratic when individuals with no preset preference join a group
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link to source Emily Badger, Miller-McCune, 2011-12-15
In a lesson taught by schools of fish, researchers determine that uninformed individuals are actually a benefit to democracy by sanding off extreme views.
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link to source Improbable Research, 2011-12-15
A democracy without a substantial number of uninformed individuals, may not know what it’s doing, metaphorically speaking. So implies this new study
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link to source Science Daily, 2011-12-15
Contrary to the ideal of a completely engaged electorate, individuals who have the least interest in a specific outcome can actually be vital to achieving a democratic consensus.
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link to source Sitabhra Sinha, Physics, 2011-10-17
How nodes connect to each other may explain why we don’t see certain classes of networks.
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link to source Costa Rica Rainforest Radio, 2011-08-02
Hoy las redes sociales están cambiando el modo y las costumbres de muchas personas alrededor del mundo. Por ejemplo hoy buscamos opiniones de dónde salir, qué hacer, cómo buscar trabajo, etc., y estas decisiones son influidas por nuestros amigos y conocidos.
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link to source Scinexx, 2011-07-25
Interaktion zwischen Einzeltieren entscheidet über Richtung des Schwarms.
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link to source om, Andes, 2011-07-24
Investigadores del Max Planck Institute for Physics of Complex Systems y un científico norteamericano de la National Science Foundation, desarrollaron un estudio que demuestra la importancia de las redes sociales para las langostas.
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link to source Antenna 3, 2011-07-23
Gli amici su Facebook comunicano tra loro come fanno le locuste nello sciame: quando si tratta di prendere delle decisioni, infatti, questi insetti si fanno condizionare dal parere dei simili che le circondano nel loro ’social network’.
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link to source Kanal 8, 2011-07-20
Das Schwärmen von Heuschrecken folgt ähnlichen Gesetzmäßigkeiten wie unsere Meinungsbildung über Facebook oder Twitter.
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link to source ACM TechNews, 2011-07-20
The swarming behavior of locusts is created by the same social networks that humans adopt
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link to source Focus Online, 2011-07-20
Nicht nur wir Menschen sind in Netzwerken miteinander verbunden. Auch ein Heuschreckenschwarm ist sozial organisiert. Und wie in unserer Gesellschaft gibt es auch hier Ausreißer, die aus der Reihe tanzen. Das wirkt sich auf alle aus.
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link to source Ansa.it, 2011-07-19
Le decisioni si prendono nello stesso modo negli sciami e nei social network
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link to source Minuto a Minuto, 2011-07-18
Para muchos las redes sociales son imprescindibles en su vida. Por dónde salir, qué hacer, cómo buscar trabajo, etcétera son algunas de las decisiones en las que nuestros amigos y conocidos influyen en nuestras decisiones. Ahora un equipo internacional de investigadores ha demostrado que los enjambres de langostas se crean con el mismo tipo de redes sociales que adoptamos los humanos.
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link to source National Geographic, Germany, 2011-07-18
Das Schwärmen von Heuschrecken folgt ähnlichen Gesetzmäßigkeiten wie unsere Meinungsbildung über Facebook oder Twitter.
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link to source Sveriges Radio, 2011-07-18
Vad har vi människor som använder facebook gemensamt med vandringsgräshoppor? Jo våra sociala nätverk avgör till stor del vilka beslut vi tar.
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link to source Gunnar De Winter, Science 2.0, 2011-07-17
Twitter and Facebook have been studied extensively and have provided some insights into the formation and maintenance of human social networks. But could this approach be adapted to gain understanding of swarming behavior in animals, say, locusts?
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link to source Azerbaijan Today, 2011-07-16
Social studies of Facebook and Twitter have been adapted to gain a greater understanding of the swarming behaviour of locusts.
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link to source EP, elEconomista.es, 2011-07-15
Los estudios sociales realizados sobre Facebook y Twitter se han adaptado para comprender el comportamiento de los enjambres de langostas, según se desprende de un estudio publicado esta semana por 'Institute of Physics and German Physical Society's New Journal of Physics'.
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link to source Le Scienze (Italian edition of Scientific American), 2011-07-15
Studi sociali sugli utenti di Facebook e Twitter sono stati utilizzati per comprendere come i loro immensi sciami si coordinino per muoversi tutti insieme anche su grandi distanze.
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link to source ellagis, Squidoo, 2011-07-15
How a swarm of animals - a swarm of locusts, for example - decides where to go, where to stop, what to eat all together? It was a big question, until researchers from the Max Planck Institute tried to answer using the rules of the social networks. Surprise: they fit.
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link to source Público.es, 2011-07-15
Una investigación demuestra que los enjambres tienen una estructura parecida a Facebook y Twitter.
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link to source Kurzweil, 2011-07-15
Insect swarming is created by the same kind of adaptive-network mechanisms that humans adopt for social networks
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link to source Sebastian Wiese, Radio Bielefeld, 2011-03-03
Ist das der Rythmus bei dem jeder mit muss? Nach welchen Kriterien unterscheiden sich Menschen was sie als gut, unterhaltsam, oder schön empfinden?
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link to source Sabiene Sütterlin, Science Blogs, 2010-08-26
Seit ich mit der Netzwerk-Gruppe zu tun habe, sehe ich überall Netzwerke. Die Leser dieses Blogs sind teilweise untereinander vernetzt, zum Beispiel. Und die Nervenzellen in unseren Gehirnen knüpfen stets neue Verbindungen
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link to source Jan Lublinski, German Public Radio (Deutschlandfunk), 2009-09-10
Netzwerke sind allgegenwärtig, sowohl in der Natur als auch in der menschlichen Gesellschaft. Aber es gibt nur sehr wenige mathematische Methoden, mit denen man Veränderungen in Netzwerken beschreiben kann. Eine Dresdner Wissenschaftlerin geht hier neue Wege
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link to source Natur + Kosmos, 2009-08-20
Was hält eine Lebensgemeinschaft im Innersten zusammen? Wissenschaftler aus Deutschland, Österreich und den USA haben mithilfe von Computersimulationen fundamentale Gesetzmäßigkeiten aufgedeckt, die die Stabilität von Ökosystemen mitbestimmen
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link to source VET-Magazin, 2009-08-07
Wissenschaftler aus Deutschland, Österreich und den USA haben mithilfe von Computersimulationen fundamentale Gesetzmäßigkeiten aufgedeckt, die die Stabilität von Ökosystemen mitbestimmen. Nahrungsnetze sind demnach stabiler, wenn Raubtierarten an der Spitze der Nahrungskette sich von verschiedenen Beutetieren ernähren und Beutearten in der Mitte der Nahrungskette vielen Räubern ausgesetzt sind.
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link to source Scinexx, 2009-08-07
Das Nahrungsnetz eines Ökosystems ist stabiler, wenn die Top-Raubtierarten keine Nahrungsspezialisten sind, sondern sich von vielen verschiedenen Beutetieren ernähren. Das haben Wissenschaftler mithilfe eines neuen Modells festgestellt. Die Berechnungen haben zudem ergeben, dass kleine Ökosysteme anderen Regeln gehorchen als große, wie die Forscher jetzt in "Science" berichten
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link to source Science Daily, 2009-08-07
New findings, published in the journal Science, conclude that food-web stability is enhanced when many diverse predator-prey links connect high and intermediate trophic levels
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link to source Natalie Bachl, Der Standard, 2009-08-07
Forscher finden Gesetzmäßigkeiten, wie Nahrungsketten stabil bleiben - Löwen gehen mit gutem Beispiel voran
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link to source ND TV, 2009-08-07
Using computer models, scientists from Germany, Austria, and the United States have discovered fundamental rules that determine the stability of ecosystems. The computations reveal that small ecosystems follow other rules than large ecosystems
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link to source Austrian Broadcasting (ORF), 2009-08-07
Vielseitige Raubtiere, die sich nicht auf eine bestimmte Beute-Art spezialisiert haben, stabilisieren Ökosysteme
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link to source Jan Lublinski, German Public Radio (Deutschlandfunk), 2009-07-06
Wie auch bei der Schweinegrippe, ist der Krankheitsverlauf des Dengue-Fiebers meist relativ harmlos. Dennoch stecken sich ganze Städte schnell mit dem Fieber an. Wie die Ausbreitung abläuft, untersuchen derzeit Wissenschaftler in Dresden - mit Hilfe von Mathematik
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