BioND — Dynamics of Biological Networks

Fission yeast does not age under favorable conditions, but does so after stress

Miguel Coelho, Aygül Dereli, Anett Haese, Sebastian Kühn, Liliana Malinovska, Morgan E. de Santis, James Shorter, Simon Alberti, Thilo Gross, and Iva M. Tolic-Nørrelykke
Current Biology 23(19), 1844-1852, 2013.

Abstract

Abstract

Many unicellular organisms age: as time passes they divide more slowly and ultimately die. In budding yeast, asymmetric segregation of cellular damage results in ageing mother cells, and rejuvenated daughters. We hypothesize that the organisms in which this asymmetry is lacking, or can be modulated, may not undergo aging. We performed a complete pedigree analysis of micro-colonies of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe growing from a single cell. When cells were grown under favourable conditions, none of the lineages exhibited aging, which is defined as a consecutive increase in division time and increased death probability. Under favourable conditions, few cells died and their death was random and sudden rather than following a gradual increase in division time. Cell death correlated with the inheritance of Hsp104-associated protein aggregates. After stress, the cells that inherited large aggregates showed a consecutive increase in division time and an increased death probability, therefore exhibiting aging. Their sisters, who inherited little or no aggregates, did not age. We conclude that S. pombe does not age under favourable growth conditions, but does so under stress. This transition appears to be passive rather than active and results from the formation of a single large aggregate, which segregates asymmetrically at the subsequent cell division. We argue that this damage-induced asymmetric segregation has evolved to sacrifice some cells so that others may survive unscathed after severe environmental stresses.

Media Coverage

Phil Hammond, BBC Radio Bristol, 2013-09-21
The only place where you can book a regular appointment with a GP on a Saturday.
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PA, Huffington Post, 2013-09-14
For lessons in anti-ageing, we need look no further than celebrities who are obsessed with youth and suffer disastrous consequences at the end of a plastic surgeon's knife. However, could there finally be a solution in nature for a more natural-looking method of anti-ageing?
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2013-09-13, The Herald, 2013-09-13
The yeast microbe, called S. pombe, is said to be immune to ageing, as it rejuvenates every time it reproduces.
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VLM, Evening Gazette (Croatia), 2013-09-13
Istraživa?ki tim pokazao je da su stanice pivskog kvasca Schizosaccharomyces pombe imune na starenje kada se reproduciraju i rastu pod odre?enim uvjetima.
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Claudia Lord, Bild, 2013-09-13
Es ist ein Menschheitstraum – die ewige Jugend! Jetzt kam Dr. Iva Tolic-Nørrelykke (39) vom Max-Planck-Institut für Molekulare Zellbiologie und Genetik dem Geheimnis ein großes Stück näher!
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The Scotsman, 2013-09-13
A MICROBE that stays forever young and could help unlock the secrets of ageing has been discovered by scientists.
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Western Daily Press, 2013-09-12
A microbe that stays forever young and could help unlock the secrets of ageing has been discovered by scientists.
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Guernsey Press, 2013-09-12
A microbe that stays forever young and could help unlock the secrets of ageing has been discovered by scientists.
(more)

Norbert Lossau, Die Welt, 2013-09-12
Seegurken, Süßwasserpolypen oder Pilze machen es uns vor: Sie können offenbar ewig leben. Eine Hefe-Art aber treibt es auf die Spitze: Sie verjüngt sich sogar.
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